Educational Travel Tips – How to Not Suck the Fun Out

The mere fact that young students will be heading off on an educational travel trip is often enough to get their blood running hot, but too many teachers and planners ruin the experience by staging everything in a stiffly academic manner. There is a time and a place for strict pedagogical lessons, and there are times when you simply need to let loose the excitement, imagination and innate curiosity of children.If you want your young pupils to get the most from their educational travel, you may want to keep these simple tips in mind.Find exciting attractions with underlying themesYou would be surprised at how many rides, attractions and theme parks have a theme that you can make use of. For example, Parc Asterix in France is a theme park rife with historical references to the Romans, the Gauls, the Egyptians and even the Vikings. Even the various Disney parks are themed to classic fairy tales, each with a moral lesson to impart. The secret here is to identify these themes and prepare questions or assignments related to these themes.

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});
Find interactive experiences for the childrenYoung students will be much more inclined to learn if they use or play with something instead of having it explained to them. This is the reason why the aforementioned rides and attractions are ideal choices for educational travel destinations. Museums and exhibitions, however, pose a problem for young children, as they can’t go manhandling priceless artefacts or works of art. There are, though, certain institutions that have their own programs designed specifically for children. Call them up and ask them beforehand to find out if they have something suitable for your students.Make sure there is an exciting story for each of your destinationsThere is a reason why tour guides come highly recommended: these individuals know a great deal about the history of the sights and are adept at weaving a compelling story from what would first appear to be useless and boring objects. A simple obsidian arrowhead may not look like much at first glance, but attaching a story of how the hunters of old would carve out their own weapons to hunt large and fearsome monsters straight out of myth would be more than enough to get the attention of students. Apply this to other artefacts, works of art and feats of modern science and you can transform mundane objects into important components of a story.

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});
Make sure the children get rest – and are able to expend energyTired children are bored children, and even if your students are young and bursting with energy, they will eventually lose interest if you push them through too many activities at once. This is especially important to remember during the first few days of educational travel, as the students may be jet lagged or too excited to fall asleep right away. The opposite, however, rings true as well. Children with too much energy will be antsy. Plan activities where they can play, run around and let them expend their youthful energies. It’s a balance skilled parents and primary school teachers will be able to competently manage.